mint0ath
brightestofcentaurus:

NGC 1566 
NGC 1566 is an intermediate spiral galaxy located about 40 million light years away towards the constellation Dorado, the Dolphinfish. As an intermediate spiral, the galaxy lacks a well defined bar of stars at its center, but is not quite an unbarred galaxy.
NGC 1566 is the brightest of the Dorado galaxy group, as well as the second brightest Seyfert galaxy known. Seyfert galaxies have small, bright nuclei that emit radiation and possibly contain supermassive black holes. The Dorado group is one of the richest galaxy groups in the southern hemisphere, comprised of a loose collection of galaxies.
Image and information from ESA.

brightestofcentaurus:

NGC 1566 

NGC 1566 is an intermediate spiral galaxy located about 40 million light years away towards the constellation Dorado, the Dolphinfish. As an intermediate spiral, the galaxy lacks a well defined bar of stars at its center, but is not quite an unbarred galaxy.

NGC 1566 is the brightest of the Dorado galaxy group, as well as the second brightest Seyfert galaxy known. Seyfert galaxies have small, bright nuclei that emit radiation and possibly contain supermassive black holes. The Dorado group is one of the richest galaxy groups in the southern hemisphere, comprised of a loose collection of galaxies.

Image and information from ESA.

astronomicalwonders
astronomicalwonders:

Star Formation in the Rosette Nebula
 This image of NGC 2244 from the Herschel Space Observatory shows newly-formed stars shrouded in clouds of dust and gas. While the red regions on the left are baby stars similar to our own Sun, the bright blue splotches will form stars ten times more massive.
Credit: ESA/PACS & SPIRE Consortium, Frédérique Motte, Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU - CNRS/INSU - Uni. Paris Diderot, HOBYS Key Programme Consortia

astronomicalwonders:

Star Formation in the Rosette Nebula

This image of NGC 2244 from the Herschel Space Observatory shows newly-formed stars shrouded in clouds of dust and gas. While the red regions on the left are baby stars similar to our own Sun, the bright blue splotches will form stars ten times more massive.

Credit: ESA/PACS & SPIRE Consortium, Frédérique Motte, Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU - CNRS/INSU - Uni. Paris Diderot, HOBYS Key Programme Consortia